Facebook

Head Office - 519.539.1344

slide image
Mobile Slides

Shin Injuries & Education

Shin Injuries & Education

The sin area consists of two bones including the Tibia and the Fibula - The TIBIA (shin bone) is the larger/thicker/stronger of the 2 bones (2nd largest in the body) and is located on the medial (inner) side of the lower leg - The functions of the Tibia include: supporting movement and impact force during walking up to 4.7 times body weight, insertion points for many powerful muscles that move foot and lower leg. The FIBULA is the name of the other smaller/thinner long bone in the lower leg which is situated on the lateral (outside) portion of the lower leg. It is a non weight bearing bone that stabilizes the ankles and tibia and assists in rotation of ankle. The tibia and fibula connect the knee with the ankle bones.

MTSS (SHIN SPLINTS)

MTSS (SHIN SPLINTS)
Definition:Shin splints is the common term for MTSS (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome) and is described as pain along the bottom 2/3 of the inside aspect of the shin bone. It is a result of inflammation of the 'periosteum' (connective tissue).
Function:There are several muscles, gastrocnemius, soleus, and flexor digitorum longus that originate at the shin border and excessive use by all or some of them can cause damage.
Mechanism of Injury

With excessive pronation, certain muscles are in high demand. This overuse of the tendons causes extra stress to the connective tissue at the bone, which is the periosteum.

Signs & Symptoms

• Aches and pain along the shin bone
• The area is tender and sore to touch
• Pain may be felt before, during, or after activity

Causes

• Overuse
• Sudden increase in distance or intensity of a workout schedule/overtraining
• Flat feet (the shin muscles are involved in maintaining the instep or arch of the foot. Flat feet can pull at the shin tendons and cause slight tearing
• Tight calf muscle (Achilles tendon)
• Weak ankles
• Increased pronation of the midfoot/poor biomechanics
• Higher body mass-inadequate footwear for athletic activity
• High impact activities

Pedorthic Treatments

Custom made Orthotics are a very effective method to reduce your pain. They are able to redistribute and load the foot in a different way in order to decrease stress to the periosteum. Pedorthists use interventions such as medial arch support and deep heel cups to stabilize the foot. Proper footwear is just as important as the orthotic in decreasing your pain. Talk to your Pedorthist about proper footwear choices for you.

Other Treatment

• Rest
• Ice
• Massage therapy for tight calves
• Compression sleeves
• Taping tecniques.

POSTERIOR TIBIALIS
TENDONITIS

POSTERIOR TIBIALIS
TENDONITIS
Definition:The Posterior Tibialis Tendon is an important structure that works to hold up the arch of the foot. It runs behind the ankle bone on the inside of your ankle (medial malleolus), across the instep and attaches to the inside of the midfoot Sometimes this tendon can become overstretched or inflammed. This can lead to an aquired flat foot. There are several names for this type of condition such as, tibialis posterior tendon dysfunction, adult acquired flatfoot deformity and tibialis posterior insufficiency.
Function:Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) can be caused by a dysfunction or partial/complete tear of the posterior tibialis muscle/tendon.
Mechanism of Injury

• Pain along the inside of the ankle into the long arch.
• The pain becomes worse with activities or longer periods of standing.
• An insufficient ability to push off your toes when running.
• Unsteady feeling when walking.
• New pain develops around outside ankle bone.
• Change in footshape (loss of arch) in the later stages.

Signs & Symptoms

• Pain along the inside of the ankle into the long arch.
• The pain becomes worse with activities or longer periods of standing.
• An insufficient ability to push off your toes when running.
• Unsteady feeling when walking.
• New pain develops around outside ankle bone.
• Change in footshape (loss of arch) in the later stages.

Causes

• An acute injury, such as a fall.
• Overuse by people who do high impact sports.
• Flat feet or feet that overpronate (when the inside ankle and arch roll towards the ground).
• Poor blood supply.
• Most common in women over 40 years old.
• Additional risk factors are obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure.

Pedorthic Treatments

Custom made Orthotics are a very effective method to reduce your pain. They are able to redistribute and load the foot in a different way in order to decrease stress to the long arch and ankles. Pedorthists use interventions such as a deep heel cups, and a stabilizing arch support. Proper footwear is just as important as the orthotic in decreasing your pain. Talk to your Pedorthist about proper footwear choices for you.

Other Treatment

• Rest
• Ice 15 minutes several times a day.
• Physiotherapy and bracing
• Taping
• In extreme cases, surgery

← Back to Injury Locator